Still digesting…

… the outcome of the Brexit referendum, yes. Or the fact that Austrian presidential elections need to be repeated, yes. But also, and on a more positive and scientific note, still digesting articles at eLife. It’s almost exactly a year since I did a short internship with their Features Editorial team, at the end of which my boss, Peter Rodgers, asked whether I would consider continue writing as a freelancer. Consider it? Of course. Yes, no consideration needed. I don’t think I could conceal quite how pleased I was with the offer. So for almost a year now I have been writing one digest a week (about two hours worth of work) and here I’d just like to highlight a few of the most interesting ones.

Inactivation of the ATMIN/ATM pathway protects against glioblastoma formation

This was the second paper that landed in my inbox to digest. When I read the subject line I was a bit baffled by the coincidence, because it surely had to be a coincidence. The lead author of this paper was none other than my current PhD supervisor with whom I was scheduled to start a month later.
The main finding of this paper was a little bit counter-intuitive. The first author, Sophia Blake, studied glioblastomas, the most aggressive form of brain cancer, iand found that when she deleted a tumour suppressor gene called p53 in mice, the animals developed these tumours. So far so good. However, when she deleted a second tumour suppressor called ATMIN at the same time, fewer mice got fewer and smaller tumours.  The paper then goes into some mechanistic detail of how this happens and finishes by showing that there are probably similar processes at play in human glioblastomas.

Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1976-2014

Most often the papers I read and digest are about cancer, stem cells or molecular biology. Here, however, I got to take a look at an epidemiology study: the authors compiled data for seven Ebola outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. To me the most interesting observation was that outbreaks that had, at the outset, a high “reproduction number” – the number of people a single infected person transmits the disease to – were caught and contained early. However, when this reproduction number was smaller than about three the outbreaks seemed to be dealt with less quickly, leading to an overall greater negative effect.

Pericytes are progenitors for coronary artery smooth muscle

In this paper Volz et al. used fluorescent imaging to track the progression of epicardial cells (on the surface of the heart) deep into the muscle tissue of the heart. Using these microscopy techniques, the authors could follow how the epicardial cells become smooth muscle cells, cells that contract and relax, in the coronary arteries. Clicking on the image below will take you to a video consisting of snapshots taken from the outside of a mouse heart to further within. The epicardial cells first become so-called pericytes, cells that normally support blood vessels, and then eventually turn into smooth muscle cells.

pericytes

Snapshot from the first video in Volz et al.

Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties

This last paper I want to mention briefly because it is on a subject that is similar to my project. Fessart et al. studied what can make lung and breast cancer cells more aggressive, more tumorigenic. They noticed that a protein called AGR2, which is normally found within cells where it helps to fold other proteins correctly, can also be secreted outside cells. When this happens AGR2 can make healthy lung cells cancerous.

Almost one year of PhD is already over, three more to go. I think we can count ourselves lucky if, by the end of it, we have a nice story to publish…

References:

Blake SM, Stricker SH, Halavach H, Poetsch AR, Cresswell G, Kelly G, Kanu N, Marino S, Luscombe NM, Pollard SM, Behrens A (2016) Inactivation of the ATMIN/ATM pathway protects against glioblastoma formation. eLife 5: e08711

Fessart D, Domblides C, Avril T, Eriksson LA, Begueret H, Pineau R, Malrieux C, Dugot-Senant N, Lucchesi C, Chevet E, Delom F (2016) Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties. eLife 5: e13887

Rosello A, Mossoko M, Flasche S, Van Hoek AJ, Mbala P, Camacho A, Funk S, Kucharski A, Ilunga BK, Edmunds WJ, Piot P, Baguelin M, Muyembe Tamfum J-J (2015) Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1976-2014. eLife 4: e09015

Volz KS, Jacobs AH, Chen HI, Poduri A, McKay AS, Riordan DP, Kofler N, Kitajewski J, Weissman I, Red-Horse K (2015) Pericytes are progenitors for coronary artery smooth muscle. eLife 4: e10036

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